The Other Man

Release

The Other Man

Label: 
Herzog Records
Vertrieb: 
Edel/finetunes
Kat.Nr: 
901026 HER
Promotion: 

TV, Radio, Print, Online

Booking: 

Herzog Booking

Rüdiger Herzog

r.herzog@herzogbooking.com

VÖ: 
24.02.2012
- The Other Man

With the work "The Other Man", again recorded with his proven team around producer Ulf Kleiner, Jeff Cascaro intensively traces his initial soul drive again, turning inwards to create space for the essence. "This album sounds more transparent, manageable and acoustic," he explains. In fact, there's a warm, grounded sound coming towards you. A sound that doesn't want to convince with stylish finesse, but with sovereign reduction, which of course isn't to be confused with asceticism. And in which everything is exactly in its place: the Fender Rhodes and Hammond accents, the funkyness of an economical guitar, the soulful grooves of the rhythm section and the grandiose flashing of brass - just by the way, Cascaro himself plays the trombone and trumpet solos. In the center of course always his voice, which has increased unmistakably again in depth and expression spectrum.

There's the title track about the supposedly deceived man who puzzles about the "Other" - Cascaro slips into the role of the jealous with a laconic tone. In "The Girl Who Got Away" he plays wonderful Mellow qualities over his entire vocal range, then makes a sincere, timeless confession of love in "Stop! In a leaned back mood reminiscent of Marvin Gaye with wonderful polyphonic sentences in the chorus, the relaxed, light-hearted "You" goes. Cascaro has left his very own mark on the respect for Al Green in the six-minute version of "Let's Stay Together", which is very harmonious in this album context - with a moving acappella intro.

Central to the album is the Southern groove "Beale Street", with which the root search leads to the epicentre of Memphis, including a boiling trombone solo. And finally, jazz greats from Charles Mingus to Ray Brown are paid tribute in the complex grooves and harmonies of "Swing Thing", which even challenges the protagonist to a scat interlude. "I've never distinguished between jazz, soul and blues, can't say how much of this and that is in my music. I am a musician. Period. And my goal is that I can always tell more mature and reflective stories." Jeff Cascaro undoubtedly succeeded with "The Other Man".

 

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